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With so many warm welcomes, maybe the word itself is wearing its out. Well, come now, I bet you three more welcomes, these ones less eye-catchy and more sincere (although in fact the above just happened to be residue from testing margins for web design - Cascading Style Sheets), that you didn't reflect upon your being such an echonomist. Such echoes select the subject of this site: the economy of language and its utterances. In particular, the macroeconomic scale of public discourse - the sounds, soundbytes, stories, and symbols that circulate to define cultural currents. "Echonomics" aims to collect and analyze these linguistic currencies, in particular within Canada, and in particular currencies discussing or relating to other currencies, such as money, within other economic flows, such as (inter)national economies. What are the inflationary thresholds that define, constrain, or liberate our freedom of speech, and languages themselves? How do certain words rise in value over others? Which words, at what times, and by what speakers? Whose speech is "representative"? To what degree? "Echonomics" strives to amass a repository of research and publications across the Internet, in particular those pertaining to discussions of Canadian political economy, in order to analyze linguistic circulations from an economic perspective.